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Water Distribution

Pump Station & Storage Reservoirs

July 19, 2021

Pump Station & Storage Reservoirs

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Water Source Resiliency
For Southwest Minnesota

Lincoln-Pipestone Rural Water System

Project Owner:
Lincoln-Pipestone Rural Water System

Key Experience:

  • Designed pump station for versatility with three initial discharge headers, one future discharge header, and two fill directions for the reservoirs
  • Reconfigured distribution system including controls of existing facilities to accommodate replacement water source

Key Features:

  • 21-mile, 14-inch diameter PVC pipeline
  • Two 400,000-gallon glass-fused-to-steel ground storage reservoirs
  • 1,620 gpm pump station
  • New connection to serve the City of Edgerton

Lincoln-Pipestone Rural Water System (LPRW) serves approximately 4,500 customers, including 32 towns as bulk customers, in ten southwest Minnesota counties. Traditionally, LPRW treated water from their Holland water source using a reverse osmosis (RO) treatment process to remove nitrate in parallel with pressure filters for iron and manganese removal. When the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency notified LPRW that their RO discharge permit would be discontinued, LPRW needed to secure a replacement treatment process or replacement water source.

To fill this need, LPRW and DGR Engineering (DGR) undertook the Edgerton Pump Station, Reservoirs, and Pipeline project. The improvements allowed LPRW to replace the source capacity lost at the Holland water source with their water allocation from Lewis & Clark Regional Water System. LPRW is one of the founding members of Lewis & Clark, and LPRW’s ability to adapt to an alternative water source is a credit to the organization’s foresight and resiliency.

DGR tackled the unique challenge of fundamentally changing operations for the south half of LPRW’s system. LPRW’s original Edgerton Pump Station received water from the Holland WTP and pumped it east to serve customers and to fill the Chandler Elevated Tank. A new Edgerton Pump Station was designed to handle all of the same demands as the original Edgerton Pump Station and to pump water back toward the Holland WTP to serve territory previously upstream of the original Edgerton Pump Station.

Lewis & Clark has a metering facility for Rock County Rural Water District at the City of Magnolia, MN and agreed to sell water to LPRW from that facility. DGR designed 21 miles of 14-inch diameter PVC pipeline to deliver water from Lewis & Clark’s meter station to the new Edgerton Pump Station. The pipeline design includes provisions for a future booster station, which will be needed if LPRW purchases more water from Lewis & Clark in the future.

During preliminary planning, the City of Edgerton requested a bulk water service connection from LPRW. The pipeline was intentionally routed to pass near the city’s well building for a service connection to the city. A related project for a meter/pump station for the city service is currently under construction.

The pipeline delivers water to two 400,000-gallon, glass-fused-to-steel ground storage reservoirs at the Edgerton Pump Station site. The reservoirs provide flow equalization and improve pump station operability and reliability. Two reservoirs allow for redundancy in case one reservoir is out of service for maintenance or repairs.
The new Edgerton pump station consists of seven vertical multistage pumps which serve three separate discharge headers, and the station includes provisions for increasing the capacity in the future. Special consideration was given to the pipe and valve configuration so pumps can be used for multiple headers for redundancy. The station also is able to fill the reservoirs from the Holland WTP in case of source interruption from Lewis & Clark.

DGR worked closely with LPRW to incorporate preferences for station layout, pump size selection, and station capability options. DGR designed the control system and worked with multiple SCADA providers to coordinate control integration for the new facility and for communications with other water systems.

Total construction cost of the pump station, reservoirs, and pipeline project was $5.1 million, which was financed using a combination of USDA Rural Development loan and Minnesota Public Facilities Authority Point Source Implementation Grant (PSIG) funding. DGR worked with LPRW to secure funding and administer state prevailing wage requirements dictated by the PSIG funding. The new Edgerton Pump Station will allow LPRW to meet current and future water demands and provide their customers with reliable, high quality water.

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Site Development

April 27, 2021

Site Development

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site layout and grading key
to project's success

Sunnybrook Village, Sioux City, IA

Project Owner:
AP Sioux City, Dallas, TX

Key Experience:

  • Building Layout Coordination
  • Site Access
  • Site Utilities
  • Significant Site Grading

Key Features:

  • 42-acre retail development
  • Two primary retail buildings
  • Four outlots
  • Free-standing buildings

The area’s growing population had generated demand for additional shopping options in Sioux City, Iowa. DGR Engineering (DGR) worked with the developer and initial tenants to develop a 42-acre retail subdivision on the south end of Sunnybrook Drive.

Prior to 2000, the area consisted of farm ground and an open ditch. The Sunnybrook Plaza project included installation of a 3,000 ft. box culvert through the site and grading to fill in the ditch. Also included in the project were utilities, a lift station, site grading and paving of Sunnybrook Drive to support the two main anchors, Target and Lowe’s, along with six other lots for future tenants.

Later, DGR projects included additional grading and paving of Sergeant Road, the extension of Sunnybrook Drive to Christy Road, and preliminary grading for the future site of Sunnybrook Village.

DGR worked with the developer to put together a preliminary layout for the site. However, when Fleet Farm expressed interest in putting a 200,000+ square foot building on the site, a significant revision was needed to fit the larger building footprint and required parking on the site.

The use of AutoCAD Civil3D® allowed DGR to redesign the site plans by moving the building pad back toward the hill and steepening the slope behind the building. Coordination between multiple entities to create a mutually satisfying layout of buildings, parking area, utilities and street access was a main element of the planning process.

The current construction will provide 274,000 square feet of retail space for Fleet Farm and Hobby Lobby, a free-standing Fleet Farm car wash/gas station/convenience store and room for an additional 44,900 square feet of retail space. 1,208 parking stalls will be provided in the initial phase of construction. Future development on the site will include four outlots for future stores or restaurants, as well as space for one additional free-standing building.

A challenge this job presented was the existing flood plain designation along Sunnybrook Drive. Documenting DGR’s previous design work on grading and storm drainage work enabled DGR to work with FEMA to obtain a Letter of Map Revision (LOMR). This removed the flood plain designation, allowing work to move forward on the project.

Site utilities include installation of water main and sanitary sewer to serve each building, as well as storm sewer to collect site runoff. The runoff will be delivered to an existing 72” storm sewer along the front of the site. It will then be carried into the existing storm water detention area on the south side of Christy Road.

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Force Main Replacement

April 15, 2021

The City of Brandon’s existing sanitary sewer force main had separated under Split Rock Creek along the north side of Aspen Boulevard. The City put a temporary force main in place to maintain service to the residents east of Split Rock Creek, which ran across the Aspen Boulevard bridge over the creek.

To avoid the line freezing, and prevent the potential issue of the exposed temporary force main being damaged by traffic, the City needed a repair project designed and constructed in a short time frame. DGR Engineering (DGR) was contracted to design a new force main that would be installed under Split Rock Creek, and at the same time, a new 16” water main was designed to replace the existing water line to facilitate future development needs.

The City had also been experiencing severe erosion in the ditch east of Split Rock Creek and wanted to address that issue along with the project. DGR engineers worked with several suppliers to find an appropriate erosion control solution that would withstand the runoff flows and grades in the ditch up to 15%. Flexamat was chosen as the best product to meet the needs of the City.

Water Main Replacement

October 5, 2018

This project consisted of water main replacement on St. Paul Avenue from Benson Road to 39th Street North in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.  Work included water main replacement, sanitary manhole repair, replacement of surfacing over trenches, and boulevard restoration.  The water main replacement successfully utilized both open trenching and directional drilling methods.  Sanitary manhole repair included reconstructing manhole benches and inverts along with installing manhole external frame seals.

Water Main Extension

October 5, 2018

This project consisted of installing 8” water main beginning approximately 1,700 feet southwest of the Great Bear entrance road and continuing 3,700 feet to the northeast.  This project included water main installation, asphalt removal and replacement, and site restoration and grading.  Also included in this project was the grading and paving for a turn lane approximately 600 feet long on Rice Street for the proposed TJN site.